Nvidia cards
  • I recently bought a new workstation and spent a lot of thought on which gpu card to put in - I plumbed for the Q4000 (the safe option) rather than one of the new GTX cards with all those cuda cores with the idea that I can easily put a tesla card in later if the CS suite/ C4D start levering more/any GPU rendering reliance. I also decided on a single CPU i7 setup with the idea of buying a separate rendering unit. This was mainly cost related but was a tricky decision to make with the E5 xeons dangling their cqrrots under my nose.

    What are your thoughts on GPU/CPU rendering future and how the GTX cards are performing?
  • Honestly, I've been having a lot of success with the new nvidia Kepler cards (GTX 690, 680, 670, 640). While I do use them primarily for game dev now, they have come in handy with a lot of high-production hybrid renderers such as Arion and Iray. In many cases with the former, the graphics card I'm using (GTX 680) keeps up the pace with an i7-3930K.

    Again, the areas that I'm using these components in are probably a good deal different than most people here, but they are also an extremely cost effective alternative.
  • I use a VERY VERY CHEAP GTX 470 which does just fine for CUDA-related tasks in CS5 and blisters along in Octane render.. how well it performs under CS6 remains to be seen. Anyone know if you can edit the card list in CS6 like you could in CS5 to hack cheaper cards?

    Quite honestly I have absolutely zero interest in using the new 3D features in CS6, so I suppose it might make more sense to pick up another raid array for the persistent disk cache.
  • Ye with CS6 I think its a balancing act currently between CPU, GPU and a fast cache disk. I went SSD for the cache and it flies. I would say at this stage that it was well worth the bucks. The pricing of the GTX cards certainly is very enticing although I have heard there may be some issues with getting them to work with CS6 as far as direct compute etc? Im not very offay on this front.....
  • I actually ran across this the other week on Twitter. This is a rough breakdown of various nVidia GPUs in CS6 rendering a ray-traced scene in AE by rendernyc and j_salvo.


    image

    The full sheet can be found here. They also put together this chart of price vs performance:


    image

    Originally, I was thinking of getting a gtx580 for my new Mac Pro when I order it, but now I'm considering a 480. It's just hard to say since the test weren't done on a common system. Still, I'd rather have CUDA cores at this point than rely on OpenCL, since Adobe is only just barely supporting it, and only on MacBook Pros.

  • dan_hin said: I use a VERY VERY CHEAP GTX 470 which does just fine for CUDA-related tasks in CS5 and blisters along in Octane render.. how well it performs under CS6 remains to be seen. Anyone know if you can edit the card list in CS6 like you could in CS5 to hack cheaper cards?


    Yes. I do that same hack because mine didn't make the cut for CS5 and had to do it again when upgrading an old project to CS6. AE does the GPUSniffer.exe as well but lacks a CUDA text file to modify.

    I'd like to beef up my system but I'm probably leaning towards maxing out my i7 socket 1366 support before graphics card.

    And I'm still adjusting to the new global caching. I should try directing it towards my SSD to benefit more. New software, new woes.
  • Yeah looks like the cache is the bottleneck right now, I've messed with the 3d stuff in AE now and it looks like the trusty 470 will deal with pretty much anything I throw at it. I've noticed I'm getting some nice speed boosts in AME cs6 too, like parallel encoding h264 files. Living in the future is amazing.

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