Budgets
  • Thought I'd ask this since I had a fairly good moan about it to @eyedesyn on Twitter. 

    If you're able (contractually and morally) to discuss this issue - what do you think your average budget for a given job is? There is no nefarious data-harvesting reason behind my request; I'm just trying to work out where I fit in the mograph food chain..

    Since I asked I guess I'd better let on mine - generally between 1 and 2 days for "section" and lower third package; and sometimes about a week for longer things like DVD menus and title sequences...

    Dan
  • I'd say mine come pretty close to yours Dan. Typically for anything smaller or broadcast, it tends to be a quick day or two turnaround. Other things range from 1-2 weeks. Sadly right now, I've been dealing with a project where things have been falling apart on the back-end, and I've now been working on it over a month.

    Occasionally it does vary, but I'd say overall, a couple weeks.
  • I'm in a slightly different boat since I mostly work on broadcast commercials. Those are all over the map. Anywhere from one day to two weeks. Sometimes it's simple animation, other times it's a complicated modeling, compositing, and camera work. I guess what I'm trying to say is that in my world, there is no average budget. But I can tell you they're all getting smaller.
  • Interesting - and worrying. Do you guys get to work as part of a team and split workflow or do you generally have to do everything yourself?
  • I don't really have many mograph projects anymore. Some roto now and then, which normally only last 1-2 days, but most of my projects are month or multi-month long. My current project only has an arbitrary deadline O_o. And yes, I am doing everything by myself. Doing a job that should be done by a team of at least 2-3 other modelers. My work days are 10-12 hours long normally.
  • @dan_hin Mostly self-contained, one designer to a project doing both editing and graphics. On larger projects, it's split. It's just the necessity of the way the shop works. Clients come in expecting to work with one person. Though that changes when they bring in larger budget items and expect to see more people on the job.
  • @conigs this is actually pretty interesting! Where I work producers deal with the client-facing stuff (together, generally, with a freelance editor in the edit bay) and the part of the process I work on is taken care of "in the dark" if you like. 

    Suits me - there's nothing that unsettles me more than a client looking over my shoulder impatiently waiting for "that green bar" to finish...

    I realise I veered slightly off topic there. @odd_enough damn that sounds like you're working hard there. Time for a holiday*?

    *vacation
  • I work at a TV and usually I'm given my time on projects , a typical project for me would include opening sequence , credits , bumpers . lower thirds and other broadcast elements for a given TV show and would take me anything between 2 weeks and a month but usually because we are allowed to take our time . I work on smaller projects too here with tighter deadlines such as promotions and I even did a show in one day when I was asked to . I feel however that yes I take too much time on the projects . 

    I don't like to work with others , We have two designers and 3 Animators including me and the HOD so we can split the work but I prefer not to
  • @dan_hin Weekends are my vacations :P

    Honestly, while I am working long hours, it doesn't feel like it. The day goes by so fast, that I sometimes work even later because I don't want to go home yet. I just end up having too much fun. "All work and no play"? Nope. All play.

    Though the days that the interns come by are a drag. -_-

  • @odd_enough @dan_hin A 10-12 hour day is pretty common here too, and usually 6 day weeks, but I don't mind, love it really and dont have to work for anyone else but me.....I think anyone expecting to do 8 hour days with a lunch break in motion graphics would be sorely disappointed and fall behind in the pecking order super quick unless they are some kind of genius who works at breakneck speeds with the same high quality results.
  • dazpix said: @odd_enough @dan_hin A 10-12 hour day is pretty common here too, and usually 6 day weeks, but I don't mind, love it really and dont have to work for anyone else but me.....I think anyone expecting to do 8 hour days with a lunch break in motion graphics would be sorely disappointed and fall behind in the pecking order super quick unless they are some kind of genius who works at breakneck speeds with the same high quality results.



    I'm not sure if I get this , you are saying its OK to work more than eight hours a day (extra hours) if I'm a full-time Motion GFX artist ? I used to stay late a lot sometimes 4 or 5 hours on almost a regular basis but now I'm starting to distance myself away from that ! Do you think that gives me a disadvantage in the workplace ?
  • @Zickar If I am using freelancers I am more likely to use those who are willing to put a little extra effort in or get a render setup in time for an overnighter than someone who walks out the door bang on 6pm. Its an unfortunate truth in the way we all work longer hours than the previous generation, but staying alittle later to get something done can only be a good thing unless your employer takes you for granted.
  • dazpix @zickar That's the problem, isn't it? If you're working in a medium to low paid job with no paid overtime (just time off in lieu) then it's going to be difficult to want to make that extra effort when nothing is coming in the other direction.

    I think there's a balance to strike between cracking on with something with a deadline on, or when you know when you're on a roll...and getting into the habit of doing 2 or 3 extra hours a night.

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