Tag: timeline

GM FoldLayers

For a long time now, several people have voiced opinions on wanting to have layer groups in the After Effects Timeline. We even covered it a while back and included a mockup of how it might work. Well, the good people of Goodmotion—pun intended—have just previewed something they’ve been working on: GM FoldLayers.

This plugin appears to intelligently hide/reveal and color layers as a group using Nulls named with a ‘|’ prefix. Take a look at the video (only on Facebook at the time). The best part is this will be a free download. Someone please buy these people beers… lots of them; they deserve it.

What the F-Curve!?

What the F-Curve!?

What the F-Curve!?

Hopefully some of you out there know where I’m coming from.  You’ve been using Cinema 4D or whatever piece of software for years, and of course we all know it’s impossible to know EVERYTHING about the software.  But in our valiant effort to learn everything…we miss extremely useful nuggets along the way.  One such nugget…the F-Curve editor in Cinema 4D.

Much like in After Effects, I pretty much avoided the F-curve editor because it was difficult to understand, but soon, I learned how all those wiggly lines could work for me and take my animations to the next level while saving time and being more efficient.  One of the most useful ways to use the F-Curve editor in C4D is to be able to edit multiple animation curves at the same time.  See, I used to only work in Key Mode, it made the most sense for me and no one ever really shed light on F-Curves until I was thought to myself “There had to be an easier way than selecting curves 1 by 1 and manipulating them.”  Well, there was.

 

Key Mode

Key Mode

Go to your Timeline window and you’ll see the default “Key Mode”.  Hit spacebar.

F-Curve Mode

F-Curve Mode

Say hello to the “F-Curve Mode”. (Hit space bar again to toggle back)  In this window you can select whatever attribute on an object you want (Position, Rotation, etc.) and by holding down shift and selecting other attributes in other objects, the F-Curves of those objects will appear.  By clicking and dragging a bounding box over, say, the last keyframes of an objects animated attributes, you can do things such as easy ease the heck out of it by pulling the bezier handles to your hearts content.  You can now take your animations to the next level with very precise keyframing.  Sometimes the key to great motion graphics is the painstakingly intricate keyframing.  Subtleties sometimes separates the good animations from the great ones.  Happy F-curving!