Tag: motion graphics

Free #C4D Models: Holiday Pack

Tis the season!  Here are 4 free Cinema 4D models for use in you holiday animations this season!  You’ll get the 4 models along with the .OBJ format versions for people using other 3D programs and earlier versions of Cinema 4D.  Included in the files are the HDRI textures I used for some of the nice reflections.  Enjoy and Happy Holidays!

Download Holiday Pack

Avid Motion Graphics

Avid just sent out an email touting their newest edition to the post-production process: Motion Graphics. From the looks of it, it will be a basic, object based motion graphics application/hardware platform with 3D and text capabilities. As a mostly After Effects based motion designer, two things caught my eye:

  • Ability to import 3D objects and animate in true 3D.
  • Dynamic info for charts and type from RSS feeds, XML files, etc.

It will be interesting to see how this product develops. While I’m skeptical it will grab much market share away from After Effects, Nuke, Cinema 4D, Maya, or 3D Studio Max, I can definitely see it gaining traction in the live news world, where speed is essential—in both rendering and workflow. I don’t think it will have much in the way of compositing, more intensive 3D, or other workflows which require more time. Also, due to the (apparent) hardware-based nature of the platform, it won’t be a simple install on your current workstation.

As of this writing, no pricing or availability was available.

Avid E-Mail Release.

Avid Motion Graphics page.

Cinematography for the Motion Artist: “Dutch Angle”

Welcome to the first of hopefully many posts about the use of cinematography tips and techniques to help make your motion graphics animations more dynamic and interesting.  In this first post, we will be covering a technique that is used a lot in both cinematography and photography to add uneasiness or tension into a shot.  The “Dutch Angle” is achieved by tilting the camera off to the side so that the shot is composed with the horizon at an angle to the bottom of the frame.  Adding just a slight value to the “banking” value in your Cinema 4D camera can make big differences in the mood of your animations, adding energy & making something more dynamic looking.

For example, let’s take a look at the use of the “Dutch Angle” in BEELD.motion’s Telecine Rebrand reel:

In numerous shots you can see the use of Dutch Angle where the horizon line is not straight, but diagonal.  In these instances they don’t exactly emit a certain mood but it does add energy to the shot and it looks more interesting than if it was shot with the horizon straight.

In the second shot here, the Dutch Angle adds some more playfulness to the festive activities in the scene:

If anyone has ever had the unfortunate displeasure to see “Battlefield: Earth”, they used Dutch Angle in almost the entire film, and was ripped for it by the critics.  The name of the game here is to use it, but don’t abuse it.  Any effect can be overused and in turn, not be as impactful as a result.  The next time you build something in 3D, I urge you to try out this technique and try to step back from the Xpresso, textures, dynamics, and mograph and instead take a look at how you choose your camera angles and compose your shots.

Feedback is welcome and I hope these cinematography posts can be useful for motion graphic artists!

Do The World A Favour

Do The World A Favour

I have always had a special little place in my heart for any of Tendril’s design work. They always seem to embody a very diverse style, and a knack for conveying the message at hand effectively, through visuals. It should come as no surprise that this video, does exactly that.

Brief from Tendril:

The brief was to create a 30 second spot for a new electronics recycling program in the province of Ontario. When Agency59 first came into the studio to talk about the project, we discussed a wide range of approaches and stylistic treatments. In its first iteration, the story was to open each scene with types of electronics (audio, video, office) which would be disassembled, revealing a ‘return’ button that would act as an anchor and transition mechanism. We also explored the possibility of having each scene be executed in a different visual style. Following a round of design and research though, we went back to the drawing board and built up a new idea that would show not only disassembly but separation, detoxification and repurposing of materials cradle to cradle.

I highly recommend heading over to Tendril’s own website, and checking out some of their other great work.

Enjoy.