“Winding Roads” – Twisted Poly

Winding Roads is a short, fun animation by Nejc Polovsak, aka Twisted Poly. Nejc got started in motion design after first getting into 3D as a hobby about 10 years ago. Within three years, he had his first job. “I began with doing lots of modeling, texturing, just doing lots of stills, some game graphics, but not so much animation,” Nejc recalled in a brief email interview. That changed a couple years into his job. “I fell in love with animation and started experimenting with motion design.”

Nejc was drawn to the freedom and many possibilities of creating something in motion. “I really like idea of having good, polished design which is taken to the next level when in motion.” The converse, he says, is also true. “The best and most fun thing for me is try to combine both in the elegant way.”

Still render of Winding Roads by Twisted Poly, using Cinema 4D and Octane Render.

Still render of Winding Roads by Twisted Poly, using Cinema 4D and Octane Render.

Winding Roads came about from Nejc’s daily/weekly personal projects he uses to learn from. In this case, he was experimenting with Octane Render. “I was just trying to come up with something cool and interesting in a couple of hours,” he said. “[T]his was a good project to test out how render engine behaves with multiple lights and lots of out of focus areas.”

Staircase Ball by Twisted Poly. Rednered using Cinema 4D and Octane Render.

Staircase Ball by Twisted Poly. Rednered using Cinema 4D and Octane Render.

The layout and design we’re an extension of previous still renders Nejc had done arranging things into spherical forms. Those and other renders can be found on his Tumblr. “I wanted to try and continue to make little a series of them. That’s how I got idea of this crazy roads twisted in a ball.” Originally, cars were not even going to be a part of the project, but came about in the process as an extra detail.

Animation itself was not even one of the original goals, but Nejc thought it would be a shame to pass up the opportunity, especially given feedback from people asking to see it animated. “I didn’t plan the animation when I started this, but when I finished the still, I thought it could look pretty cool animated if cars are driving around.”

In the end, Nejc had a nice, polished little piece and learned more about how to use Octane. he leaves us with one last bit of advice. “I encourage everyone to take advantage of any free time and dive into similar fun personal projects.” Learning by doing… and having something pretty cool to show for it.

Nejc’s current setup includes a PC workstation with a 3930K over clocked to 4.2GHz, 32gb of ram, nVidia GTX 670 and 780, SSD, and dual displays (27“ + 24”) running Windows 8 with Cinema 4D and After Effects.

#mochat 103 – 2D/3D Workflow

Last night on #mochat, we talked about 2D/3D workflow and compositing.

It shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise that passes out of the 3D application of choice (depth, motion vector, object buffers, diffuse, reflection, shadow, etc) are extremely important. For a good example, @discreetflame posts a set of passes for one project. UV passes were also extremely helpful for compositing 2D graphics onto 3D objects. You’ll need a plugin like ft-UVPass to work with them.

Cineware wasn’t used by that many people (surprising or unsurprising depending on your experience with it). But C4D was generally the preferred 3D package. Element 3D and AtomKraft were also brought up for 3D integration in After Effects.

Read on for the full transcript…

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#mochat 98 – On Air with Brian Behm

Tonight we ran our first #mochat On Air, a hybrid YouTube broadcast and Twitter chat. To kick us off, Brian Behm (@flabbyironman) walked us through what it’s like to work at Rooster Teeth, a couple projects, some of his favorite tools, and baby ghost busters. It’s well worth the watch.

Since this was our first try at this, we’d love to know what worked and what didn’t, aside from the technical glitches. Is this something you’d like to see more of?

Read on for the Twitter transcript behind the video.

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#mochat 97 — Careers in Motion

For this week’s mochat, we talked reels! Particularly when starting out or going freelance, reels are likely the single most effective way to show clients what you can do. While it’s common to let them slip out of date when you’re full-time or otherwise occupied, it never hurts to keep your reel updated or give it a refresh between projects.

Some tips for updating your reel (or making your first!) —

  •  It’s okay to retime clips to fit the music. Energy is key.
  • Keep the length concise, not too short, not too long. It’s best to stick somewhere in the range of a minute to a minute and a half.
  • One thing to consider is whether you feel comfortable using unlicensed music vs. licensing or producing your own. There are a lot of quality resources for licensed music out there (one common recommendation is Killer Tracks). It’s also a good opportunity to lay down your own track if you’re so inclined.
  • Consider tailoring multiple reels to different types of clients. It can be effective to have a general reel for your web presence and tailored reels to submit to clients for different types of work.

Read on for the full transcript…

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Introducing #mochat On Air (beta)

UPDATE: This #mochat topic has been rescheduled for September 2nd. New event page is now live.

Tonight on #mochat (9PM EDT, GMT-4), Brian Behm from Rooster Teeth will be walking through some projects… and helping us test something out.

Until now, #mochat has taken place entirely on Twitter. It’s an easy way for all of us to participate in the conversation from pretty much anywhere. Tonight we’re trying out an additional layer. We will broadcast a live Google Hangout along side the Twitter chat. Conversation and questions will still continue on Twitter like normal, but the guest will be showing off work and answering questions in the broadcast. A moderator will bring questions from Twitter to the attention of the guest.

This is the first time we are trying something like this, so expect hiccups. You can watch the live broadcast on the hangout event page, and participate in the usual way—your client of choice or a service like tchat.io. And feedback is always welcome. If this goes well, this might be a monthly event on the chats.

 

#mochat 94 – Anatomy of a Reel

For this week’s mochat, we talked reels! Particularly when starting out or going freelance, reels are likely the single most effective way to show clients what you can do. While it’s common to let them slip out of date when you’re full-time or otherwise occupied, it never hurts to keep your reel updated or give it a refresh between projects.

Some tips for updating your reel (or making your first!) —

  •  It’s okay to retime clips to fit the music. Energy is key.
  • Keep the length concise, not too short, not too long. It’s best to stick somewhere in the range of a minute to a minute and a half.
  • One thing to consider is whether you feel comfortable using unlicensed music vs. licensing or producing your own. There are a lot of quality resources for licensed music out there (one common recommendation is Killer Tracks). It’s also a good opportunity to lay down your own track if you’re so inclined.
  • Consider tailoring multiple reels to different types of clients. It can be effective to have a general reel for your web presence and tailored reels to submit to clients for different types of work.

Read on for the full transcript…

- Read More -

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